Jan-Jul 2018

Access and Change: Health 3.0

The recent Health 2.0 Conference, co-organised by the Max Institute of Healthcare Management at the Indian School of Business, brought together a range of stakeholders – entrepreneurs, investors, healthcare providers and others – interested in the future of healthcare technology. One of the highlights of the day-long event was a free-wheeling, on–stage conversation between Professor Sarang Deo, Associate Professor of Operations Management and Executive Director of the Max Institute of Healthcare Management and Shashank ND, Founder and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Practo. The edited transcript of the discussion follows.

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Journey from Technology to Policy

V K Saraswat, Member of the NITI Aayog, was the Dean’s Speaker at the Indian School of Business in September 2017. Dr Saraswat is a Padma Bhushan awardee and Chancellor of Jawaharlal Nehru University. In a career spanning over four decades, Dr Saraswat helped develop the country’s first liquid propulsion engine, Devil, as well as rocket engines such as Prithvi, Dhanush and Prahaar. He has been Scientific Advisor to the Defence Minister, and (Research and Development) Secretary to the Department of Defence.

In his speech at ISB, Dr Saraswat addressed the question of inclusion in economic growth. After his talk, Reema Gupta, Head of the Centre for Learning and Management Practice and Corporate Relations at the ISB, spoke to him about his journey from science to policy-making, about building the right ecosystem for entrepreneurs and the NITI Aayog’s ongoing initiatives.

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Emergency Medical Services: Are Drones the Future?

Poor access to emergency medical care is a major barrier in the treatment of time-sensitive medical emergencies such as cardiac arrests and motor vehicle accidents. In this article, Justin J. Boutilier of the University of Toronto explores the potential of drone technology to be a transformative innovation for the provision of emergency medical services, despite a host of new technological, regulatory and operational challenges.

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Saving Lives: Emergency Medical Services in India

By the year 2025, road traffic deaths in India are expected to cross 250,000 annually. Providing timely and high-quality emergency health services is a challenge, given supply-side problems, regulatory and policy issues, and lack of awareness about emergency care in the country. A robust national emergency medical service with an interdisciplinary approach is the need of the hour to complement the country’s still evolving healthcare facilities, argued panelists at a First Practice-based Summit on Emergency Medical Services held at the Indian School of Business.

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